Discussion:
Extra Leg on Iwo Jima Memorial Statue
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b***@earthlink.net
2019-05-24 18:07:00 UTC
Permalink
As the title may suggest, I have just heard a story that the Iwo Jima
memorial
statue in Arlington Cemetery in Virginia has an extra leg in it, so that
it
"looks right" when photographed. The statue itself is a representation of
a
photograph of men planting a flag on Mount Suribachi in Iwo Jima and is
fairly
well-known.
There's a site about the statue at http://www.iwojima.com/statue/.
Once again JamiTroll strikes, asking us to do her work.
A quick trip to the above-mentioned website, www.iwojima.com, which
which any interested party could e-mail for information on the statue.
Yet JamiTroll comes to us asking questions which could easily be answered by
others.
So, JamiTroll, have you e-mailed the people who would know about the
statue's legs? If not, why?
Ragnar
PS: No, I will not e-mail them for you. Do your own homework for a change.
Why the belligerence? Simple question. If you don't know the answer, say so instead of delivering a dose of irritability. What is it with the contemporary dyspeptic impulse to get into someone's face, like a bar room drunk. Sites like this are meant to help enquiry, not bludgeon the enquirer.

The answer is elusive. The USMC discretely dodge the issue. It is almost impossible to find any sort of commentary. Forty years ago maneuvering on the periphery of the staff of the Secretary of the Navy as a very junior officer, a very senior Marine Corps officer told me that yes, there is an extra leg in the flag-raising statue. We were both VN combat veterans and he wasn't kidding. Seems that the artist looked at his finished work and thought there was too much space between the legs, and decided to add an extra leg. Whatever the case, the memorial makes an enduring, powerful statement in our current War Against Terrorism. Eric Dietrich-Berryman, CDR, USN retired
Drew Lawson
2019-05-27 00:44:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@earthlink.net
As the title may suggest, I have just heard a story that the Iwo Jima
memorial
statue in Arlington Cemetery in Virginia has an extra leg in it, so that
it
"looks right" when photographed. The statue itself is a representation of
a
photograph of men planting a flag on Mount Suribachi in Iwo Jima and is
fairly
well-known.
There's a site about the statue at http://www.iwojima.com/statue/.
Once again JamiTroll strikes, asking us to do her work.
A quick trip to the above-mentioned website, www.iwojima.com, which
which any interested party could e-mail for information on the statue.
Yet JamiTroll comes to us asking questions which could easily be answered by
others.
So, JamiTroll, have you e-mailed the people who would know about the
statue's legs? If not, why?
Ragnar
PS: No, I will not e-mail them for you. Do your own homework for a change.
Why the belligerence?
I guess somehow it just ferments and has built up in the 18 years
since Ragnar's message was posted.

In a simpler time, a time before twitter . . . .
--
Drew Lawson I had planned to be dead by now, but
the schedule slipped, they do that.
-- Casady
Lee Ayrton
2019-05-28 00:11:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@earthlink.net
As the title may suggest, I have just heard a story that the Iwo Jima
memorial statue in Arlington Cemetery in Virginia has an extra leg in it, so that
it "looks right" when photographed. The statue itself is a representation of
a photograph of men planting a flag on Mount Suribachi in Iwo Jima and is
fairly well-known.
There's a site about the statue at http://www.iwojima.com/statue/.
[...]
Post by b***@earthlink.net
The answer is elusive. The USMC discretely dodge the issue. It is almost impossible to find any sort of commentary. Forty years ago maneuvering on the periphery of the staff of the Secretary of the Navy as a very junior officer, a very senior Marine Corps officer told me that yes, there is an extra leg in the flag-raising statue. We were both VN combat veterans and he wasn't kidding. Seems that the artist looked at his finished work and thought there was too much space between the legs, and decided to add an extra leg. Whatever the case, the memorial makes an enduring, powerful statement in our current War Against Terrorism. Eric Dietrich-Berryman, CDR, USN retired
Interesting morph: The common version is that there are 13 _hands_.

There's 12.

http://www.welovedc.com/2010/04/13/dc-mythbusting-monumental-myths/
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