Discussion:
Biscuit, Cookies, etc.
(too old to reply)
Duggy
2011-08-24 22:02:08 UTC
Permalink
"biscuit" for "cookie".
I thought it would be worth see what people called the following.
I'm listed for Australian usage [1972 - 1990 NSW, 1991 - Qld] but I'd
love to hear any contradiction of even that.

Loading Image...
Australian: Biscuits, bikkies.

Loading Image...
Australian: Biscuits, bikkies, increasingly Cookies.

Loading Image...
Australian: Scones (usually sweet, some savoury varieties, rarely
"bland" with gravy)

Loading Image...
Australian: Cupcakes

Loading Image...
Australian: Muffins

Loading Image...
Australian: Muffins, English Muffins.

Loading Image...
Australian: Crumpets

Loading Image...
Australian: Pikelets

Loading Image...
Australian: Jam

Loading Image...
Australian: Jam, Fruit Conserve.

Loading Image...
Australian: Jelly

===
= DUG.
===
musika
2011-08-24 22:15:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
"biscuit" for "cookie".
I thought it would be worth see what people called the following.
I'm listed for Australian usage [1972 - 1990 NSW, 1991 - Qld] but I'd
love to hear any contradiction of even that.
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian: Biscuits, bikkies.
Yes
Post by Duggy
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9a/Choco_chip_cookie.jpg
Australian: Biscuits, bikkies, increasingly Cookies.
Yes
Post by Duggy
http://www.kfc.com/menu/images/sides_biscuits.jpg
Australian: Scones (usually sweet, some savoury varieties, rarely
"bland" with gravy)
Yes
Post by Duggy
http://cupcakegeneral.files.wordpress.com/2007/01/cupcake_stand.gif?w=490
Australian: Cupcakes
Yes
Post by Duggy
http://www.muffinrecipes.net/li/muffins.jpg
Australian: Muffins
American muffins
Post by Duggy
http://dontfollowtherules.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/english_muffin.jpg
Australian: Muffins, English Muffins.
Muffins
Post by Duggy
http://dinnerwiththeomnivore.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/buttered_crumpet2.jpg
Australian: Crumpets
Crumpets or pikelets
Post by Duggy
http://melissagoodsell.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/09/13/pikelets.jpg
Australian: Pikelets
Drop scones or Scotch pancakes
Post by Duggy
http://www.a-taste-of-france.com/images/apricot-jam.jpg
Australian: Jam
Yes

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FvdbAdcpKow/TO4GeU58JSI/AAAAAAAABAA/WCzz_BavCn8/s1600/IMG_5183.JPG
Post by Duggy
Australian: Jam, Fruit Conserve.
Yes
Post by Duggy
http://www.babygadget.net/pics/jelly.jpg
Australian: Jelly
Yes
--
Ray
UK
Jerry Friedman
2011-08-24 22:56:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
"biscuit" for "cookie".
I thought it would be worth see what people called the following.
I'm listed for Australian usage [1972 - 1990 NSW, 1991 - Qld] but I'd
love to hear any contradiction of even that.
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian:  Biscuits, bikkies.
American: Cookies if they're sweet, crackers if they're not. If
they're intended to turn into slime in the vicinity of a baby's mouth,
followed by ingestion of a small fraction, they might be called
biscuits.
Post by Duggy
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9a/Choco_chip_cookie.jpg
Australian:  Biscuits, bikkies, increasingly Cookies.
American: Cookies.
Post by Duggy
http://www.kfc.com/menu/images/sides_biscuits.jpg
Australian:  Scones (usually sweet, some savoury varieties, rarely
"bland" with gravy)
American: Biscuits if they're savory or "bland". If they're sweet,
maybe "some weird kind of sweet biscuits".
Post by Duggy
Loading Image...
Australian:  Cupcakes
American: Cupcakes.
Post by Duggy
http://www.muffinrecipes.net/li/muffins.jpg
Australian:  Muffins
American: Muffins.
Post by Duggy
http://dontfollowtherules.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/english...
Australian:  Muffins, English Muffins.
American: English muffins.
Post by Duggy
http://dinnerwiththeomnivore.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/buttered_cru...
Australian:  Crumpets
American: Can't tell them from English muffins (by looking).
Post by Duggy
http://melissagoodsell.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/09/13/pi...
Australian:  Pikelets
American: Pancakes.
Post by Duggy
http://www.a-taste-of-france.com/images/apricot-jam.jpg
Australian:  Jam
American: Jam, casually jelly.
Post by Duggy
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FvdbAdcpKow/TO4GeU58JSI/AAAAAAAABAA/WCzz_Ba...
Australian:  Jam, Fruit Conserve.
American: Jam, preserves, conserves (might depend on what the maker
calls it), casually jelly.
Post by Duggy
http://www.babygadget.net/pics/jelly.jpg
Australian:  Jelly
American: Gelatin, casually jello.

Loading Image...

American: Scones (rhymes, not necessarily in vain, with "stones")

--
Jerry Friedman is sure all this is in Wikipedia.
Peter Moylan
2011-08-25 00:46:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian: Biscuits, bikkies.
American: Cookies if they're sweet, crackers if they're not. If
they're intended to turn into slime in the vicinity of a baby's mouth,
followed by ingestion of a small fraction, they might be called
biscuits.
Australian: Rusks if they're the very hard biscuity cylinders designed
for gumming by teething babies.

Google Images didn't seem to have any clear pictures - although it
showed me hundreds of things I would not call rusks - so this is the
best I could do:

http://www.gotoddler.com.au/PhotoGallery.asp?ProductCode=042_HJH_RUSK_16036%2F1
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Robert Bannister
2011-08-25 03:09:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian: Biscuits, bikkies.
American: Cookies if they're sweet, crackers if they're not. If
they're intended to turn into slime in the vicinity of a baby's mouth,
followed by ingestion of a small fraction, they might be called
biscuits.
Australian: Rusks if they're the very hard biscuity cylinders designed
for gumming by teething babies.
Or when designed by Scandinavians as bearers of smoked salmon, cheese or
other finger food, although they may have posher names like crispbread
or knakkebrod.
--
Robert Bannister
Duggy
2011-08-25 13:07:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
"biscuit" for "cookie".
I thought it would be worth see what people called the following.
I'm listed for Australian usage [1972 - 1990 NSW, 1991 - Qld] but I'd
love to hear any contradiction of even that.
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian:  Biscuits, bikkies.
American: Cookies if they're sweet,
Loading Image...
Post by Jerry Friedman
crackers if they're not.
Australian: Biscuits or Crackers.


Loading Image...
Post by Jerry Friedman
If
they're intended to turn into slime in the vicinity of a baby's mouth,
followed by ingestion of a small fraction, they might be called
biscuits.
Australian: Rusks
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://dinnerwiththeomnivore.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/buttered_cru...
Australian:  Crumpets
American: Can't tell them from English muffins (by looking).
It is a bad photo, I guess.
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://melissagoodsell.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/09/13/pi...
Australian:  Pikelets
American: Pancakes.
That small and thick?

I can't find a picture of an Australian pancake - they're either
pikelets or crepes.
Post by Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman is sure all this is in Wikipedia.
Probably not in a translation guide like this.

===
= DUG.
===
Mike Lyle
2011-08-25 20:54:54 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 06:07:39 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Duggy
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
"biscuit" for "cookie".
I thought it would be worth see what people called the following.
I'm listed for Australian usage [1972 - 1990 NSW, 1991 - Qld] but I'd
love to hear any contradiction of even that.
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian:  Biscuits, bikkies.
American: Cookies if they're sweet,
Brit usage has "chocolate chip cookies", a.k.a. "Maryland cookies".
You can get a few others, but I think most Brits would visualize the
choc chip ones by default.
Post by Duggy
http://www.tacinept.com/Rens_Stuff/CRACKERS.JPG
Post by Jerry Friedman
crackers if they're not.
Australian: Biscuits or Crackers.
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_yQM21zF247M/S8nDJaFGEQI/AAAAAAAADYo/mCHWSRNnAFE/s1600/IMG_4098.JPG
Post by Jerry Friedman
If
they're intended to turn into slime in the vicinity of a baby's mouth,
followed by ingestion of a small fraction, they might be called
biscuits.
Australian: Rusks
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://dinnerwiththeomnivore.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/buttered_cru...
Australian:  Crumpets
American: Can't tell them from English muffins (by looking).
There is confusion between crumpets and muffins: formerly, Brit
cookery distinguished them, but the difference is/was slight, and I
suspect the variation was regional. I used to know, but I'd have to
look it up.
Post by Duggy
It is a bad photo, I guess.
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://melissagoodsell.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/09/13/pi...
Australian:  Pikelets
American: Pancakes.
That small and thick?
I can't find a picture of an Australian pancake - they're either
pikelets or crepes.
Australian pancakes are the same as Brit ones: same diameter as the
pan (say about 8"?), and a bit thicker than French crêpes.
Post by Duggy
Post by Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman is sure all this is in Wikipedia.
Probably not in a translation guide like this.
And without the all-important subjective value-judgements, to whit:

"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.

I hold that "conserve" is generally best left to commercialese, while
we punters should stick with good honest plain-spoken "jam".
--
Mike.
Peter Duncanson (BrE)
2011-08-25 21:38:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 06:07:39 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
"biscuit" for "cookie".
I thought it would be worth see what people called the following.
I'm listed for Australian usage [1972 - 1990 NSW, 1991 - Qld] but I'd
love to hear any contradiction of even that.
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian:  Biscuits, bikkies.
American: Cookies if they're sweet,
Brit usage has "chocolate chip cookies", a.k.a. "Maryland cookies".
You can get a few others, but I think most Brits would visualize the
choc chip ones by default.
Maryland is a brand name of Burton's Foods[1].
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryland_Cookies

The recipe for Maryland Cookies was brought to the UK from the USA
in 1956 and is one of the UK's best selling biscuits. Over 12
billion Maryland Cookies are sold worldwide each year. Maryland
Cookies are not actually sold in any part of the USA but they are
made in Britain.

<a list of 12 flavours>

The packaging claims that Maryland Cookies are "The ORIGINAL
Cookie," although this has yet to be verified.

Many other brands of "chocolate chip cookie" are available.

[1] Burton's Foods has various "iconic" biscuit products:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burton%27s_Foods

Cadbury Digestives (under licence from Cadbury plc)
Cadbury Fingers (also under licence from Cadbury plc)
Jammie Dodgers
Lyons Biscuits
Maryland Cookies
Viscount Biscuit
Wagon Wheels
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Moylan
2011-08-26 00:23:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
I hold that "conserve" is generally best left to commercialese, while
we punters should stick with good honest plain-spoken "jam".
"Mummy, come quick. The cat preserved its narrative in the door."
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Robert Bannister
2011-08-26 00:55:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
In Australia, it also means money.
--
Robert Bannister
Duggy
2011-08-26 04:08:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
In Australia, it also means money.
For ocker values of "in Australia".

===
= DUG.
===
Robert Bannister
2011-08-26 23:56:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
In Australia, it also means money.
For ocker values of "in Australia".
You mean there are other values?
Perhaps I should have qualified it, because you rarely hear it without
the adjective "big".
--
Robert Bannister
Duggy
2011-08-27 02:37:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Duggy
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
In Australia, it also means money.
For ocker values of "in Australia"
You mean there are other values?
In my experience, yes. In fact ocker really applies in my experience.
Post by Robert Bannister
Perhaps I should have qualified it, because you rarely hear it without
the adjective "big".
I rarely hear it outside TV and movie attempts to be ocker.

===
= DUG.
===
Duggy
2011-08-26 04:03:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 06:07:39 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian:  Biscuits, bikkies.
American: Cookies if they're sweet,
Brit usage has "chocolate chip cookies", a.k.a. "Maryland cookies".
You can get a few others, but I think most Brits would visualize the
choc chip ones by default.
I think it comes from Cookie Monster. Australian kids are taught the
big choc-chip things he eats are Cookies... so the bigger and the
chipper (less and less just choc) the more likely it is to be a
cookie. In my experience.
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Peter Moylan
Australian: Rusks
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://dinnerwiththeomnivore.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/buttered_cru...
Australian:  Crumpets
American: Can't tell them from English muffins (by looking).
There is confusion between crumpets and muffins: formerly, Brit
cookery distinguished them, but the difference is/was slight, and I
suspect the variation was regional. I used to know, but I'd have to
look it up.
I figured the difference was obvious from sight... not sure what the
difference is in them being made.
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://melissagoodsell.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/09/13/pi...
Australian:  Pikelets
American: Pancakes.
That small and thick?
I can't find a picture of an Australian pancake - they're either
pikelets or crepes.
Australian pancakes are the same as Brit ones: same diameter as the
pan (say about 8"?), and a bit thicker than French crêpes.
Exactly. All the picture I could find were crepes or pikelets.
Couldn't find a good illustrative photo.
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman is sure all this is in Wikipedia.
Probably not in a translation guide like this.
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
Sure.
Post by Mike Lyle
I hold that "conserve" is generally best left to commercialese, while
we punters should stick with good honest plain-spoken "jam".
And home-makers. When I was in charge of the cooking section of the
local show jams and conserves were two separate sections. I think if
you're making and selling these things there's a difference. If
you're buying it's all jam (or jelly) and some has fruit in.

===
= DUG.
===
R H Draney
2011-08-26 05:55:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 06:07:39 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian: =A0Biscuits, bikkies.
American: Cookies if they're sweet,
Brit usage has "chocolate chip cookies", a.k.a. "Maryland cookies".
You can get a few others, but I think most Brits would visualize the
choc chip ones by default.
I think it comes from Cookie Monster. Australian kids are taught the
big choc-chip things he eats are Cookies... so the bigger and the
chipper (less and less just choc) the more likely it is to be a
cookie. In my experience.
I always just sort of assumed he'd have a different name in Commonwealthia, like
the way "Top Cat" became "Boss Cat" in the UK...Biscuit Beast or something....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
Duggy
2011-08-26 07:54:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
I think it comes from Cookie Monster.  Australian kids are taught the
big choc-chip things he eats are Cookies... so the bigger and the
chipper (less and less just choc) the more likely it is to be a
cookie.  In my experience.
I always just sort of assumed he'd have a different name in Commonwealthia, like
the way "Top Cat" became "Boss Cat" in the UK...Biscuit Beast or something....r
Nothing on Seasame St was changed in Australia so we got in a lot of
trouble as a kid for saying "Cookie" and "Zee" instead of "Biscuit"
and "Zed".

===
= DUG.
===
R H Draney
2011-08-26 08:05:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
I think it comes from Cookie Monster. =A0Australian kids are taught the
big choc-chip things he eats are Cookies... so the bigger and the
chipper (less and less just choc) the more likely it is to be a
cookie. =A0In my experience.
I always just sort of assumed he'd have a different name in Commonwealthi=
a, like
the way "Top Cat" became "Boss Cat" in the UK...Biscuit Beast or somethin=
g....r
Nothing on Seasame St was changed in Australia so we got in a lot of
trouble as a kid for saying "Cookie" and "Zee" instead of "Biscuit"
and "Zed".
Odd...I remember watching both the Spanish- and English-language versions of the
same episode, and noticing both similarities and differences...for instance, the
Spanish one had a "commercial" for the letter T that was missing from the
English, in which kids were taught that "T is for Shark"....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
Duggy
2011-08-26 08:16:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Post by R H Draney
I think it comes from Cookie Monster. =A0Australian kids are taught the
big choc-chip things he eats are Cookies... so the bigger and the
chipper (less and less just choc) the more likely it is to be a
cookie. =A0In my experience.
I always just sort of assumed he'd have a different name in Commonwealthi=
a, like
the way "Top Cat" became "Boss Cat" in the UK...Biscuit Beast or somethin=
g....r
Nothing on Seasame St was changed in Australia so we got in a lot of
trouble as a kid for saying "Cookie" and "Zee" instead of "Biscuit"
and "Zed".
Odd...I remember watching both the Spanish- and English-language versions of the
same episode, and noticing both similarities and differences...for instance, the
Spanish one had a "commercial" for the letter T that was missing from the
English, in which kids were taught that "T is for Shark"....r
Not really that odd. Cheaper for an English language market to just
use the straight episode.

Not saying changes don't happen, but not in this case.

Actually, Australia rarely changes stuff in my experience.

===
= DUG.
===
Peter Moylan
2011-08-26 12:14:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
Post by R H Draney
Post by Duggy
I think it comes from Cookie Monster. Australian kids are taught the
big choc-chip things he eats are Cookies... so the bigger and the
chipper (less and less just choc) the more likely it is to be a
cookie. In my experience.
I always just sort of assumed he'd have a different name in Commonwealthia, like
the way "Top Cat" became "Boss Cat" in the UK...Biscuit Beast or something....r
Nothing on Seasame St was changed in Australia so we got in a lot of
trouble as a kid for saying "Cookie" and "Zee" instead of "Biscuit"
and "Zed".
One thing my eldest son learnt from Sesame Street was how to sing

A B C D E F G
H I J K la la la la P
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Robert Bannister
2011-08-26 23:58:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Duggy
Post by R H Draney
Post by Duggy
I think it comes from Cookie Monster. Australian kids are taught the
big choc-chip things he eats are Cookies... so the bigger and the
chipper (less and less just choc) the more likely it is to be a
cookie. In my experience.
I always just sort of assumed he'd have a different name in Commonwealthia, like
the way "Top Cat" became "Boss Cat" in the UK...Biscuit Beast or something....r
Nothing on Seasame St was changed in Australia so we got in a lot of
trouble as a kid for saying "Cookie" and "Zee" instead of "Biscuit"
and "Zed".
One thing my eldest son learnt from Sesame Street was how to sing
A B C D E F G
H I J K la la la la P
Elemeno, my dear Watson.
--
Robert Bannister
Peter Duncanson (BrE)
2011-08-26 09:45:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 06:07:39 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian: =A0Biscuits, bikkies.
American: Cookies if they're sweet,
Brit usage has "chocolate chip cookies", a.k.a. "Maryland cookies".
You can get a few others, but I think most Brits would visualize the
choc chip ones by default.
I think it comes from Cookie Monster. Australian kids are taught the
big choc-chip things he eats are Cookies... so the bigger and the
chipper (less and less just choc) the more likely it is to be a
cookie. In my experience.
I always just sort of assumed he'd have a different name in Commonwealthia, like
the way "Top Cat" became "Boss Cat" in the UK...Biscuit Beast or something....r
"Top Cat" became "Boss Cat" in the UK because the former was a brand
name at the time.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top_Cat#United_Kingdom_2

In the United Kingdom, the show was first aired on BBC television
(now called BBC One) but renamed Boss Cat shortly after it premiered
in 1962 because Top Cat was also the name of a brand of cat food.
The dialogue and theme tune still referred to the character by his
original name but a small cut was made in the opening credits
(resulting in a slight 'jump' in the film) and a title card added
before the episode proper. The new name was last used for a repeat
run in 1989; by the time the series was next aired in 1999 the 'Top
Cat' food brand had long since disappeared, allowing the original
title to be used.

Davis is pronounced with "-iss" and Davies with "-eez". However, some
BrE speakers people do not distinguish Davies from Davis.

The Wikip article continues:

As Welsh Conservative MP David Davies' name sounds the same as
fellow Conservative MP David Davis, a candidate in the 2005
Conservative leadership contest, confusion could occur between the
two in Westminster. Therefore, David Davies is referred to in the
House of Commons in Westminster as David T.C. Davies. This has
caused opposition MPs to refer to him in jest as Top Cat.[5]


[5]
http://daviddaviesam.blogspot.com/2005/06/anyone-remember-top-cat.html

David Davies MP blog

Sunday, June 19, 2005

Anyone remember "Top Cat"?

The week before last presented an opportunity to ask a question to
the Prime Minister during the weekly question time session. Firing
off questions at Mr Blair in a packed House of Commons is a
potentially nerve racking experience so I made sure I had rehearsed
what I was going to say.

Unfortunately I had not bargained for the effect that my initials
would have on the government benches as the speaker called "Mr David
_T. C._ Davies". As I rose to my feet several hundred people
opposite started singing the theme tune from the cartoon series "Top
Cat." Peter Hain then performed a solo version the following week.

The kindly staff at Hansard[1] had advised me to use the initials to
differentiate myself from David Davis MP Shadow Home Secretary and
Tory leadership contender. This seemed reasonable at the time.
However if the Labour back benchers don't get bored of the joke soon
we are going to have to think of something else.

[1] Hansard: the body that produces the official record of proceedings
in parliament; also the name of the parliamentary record.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Moylan
2011-08-26 12:20:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
As Welsh Conservative MP David Davies' name sounds the same as
fellow Conservative MP David Davis, a candidate in the 2005
Conservative leadership contest, confusion could occur between the
two in Westminster. Therefore, David Davies is referred to in the
House of Commons in Westminster as David T.C. Davies. This has
caused opposition MPs to refer to him in jest as Top Cat.[5]
The Australian politician Doug Anthony, who was for a long time the
leader of the Country Party, was known to some of his parliamentary
colleagues as Rubber Dougie. This was, I gather, a tribute to the
flexibility of his policies, or possibly his principles.
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Richard Bollard
2011-08-29 23:26:04 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 26 Aug 2011 22:20:00 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
As Welsh Conservative MP David Davies' name sounds the same as
fellow Conservative MP David Davis, a candidate in the 2005
Conservative leadership contest, confusion could occur between the
two in Westminster. Therefore, David Davies is referred to in the
House of Commons in Westminster as David T.C. Davies. This has
caused opposition MPs to refer to him in jest as Top Cat.[5]
The Australian politician Doug Anthony, who was for a long time the
leader of the Country Party, was known to some of his parliamentary
colleagues as Rubber Dougie. This was, I gather, a tribute to the
flexibility of his policies, or possibly his principles.
He was a country member.

Remember?
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
Duggy
2011-08-29 23:54:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Bollard
On Fri, 26 Aug 2011 22:20:00 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
    As Welsh Conservative MP David Davies' name sounds the same as
    fellow Conservative MP David Davis, a candidate in the 2005
    Conservative leadership contest, confusion could occur between the
    two in Westminster. Therefore, David Davies is referred to in the
    House of Commons in Westminster as David T.C. Davies. This has
    caused opposition MPs to refer to him in jest as Top Cat.[5]
The Australian politician Doug Anthony, who was for a long time the
leader of the Country Party, was known to some of his parliamentary
colleagues as Rubber Dougie. This was, I gather, a tribute to the
flexibility of his policies, or possibly his principles.
He was a country member.
Remember?
Of course I remember.

Now that they're the National Party people call them The Nats. People
make jokes about it being a good thing that aren't still the Country
Party then. A friend even admitted that they make that joke at
National Party meetings. But when an opponent made the joke in
parliament it was a horror and they demanded it be removed from the
record.

===
= DUG.
===
Robert Bannister
2011-08-30 00:32:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
Post by Richard Bollard
On Fri, 26 Aug 2011 22:20:00 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
As Welsh Conservative MP David Davies' name sounds the same as
fellow Conservative MP David Davis, a candidate in the 2005
Conservative leadership contest, confusion could occur between the
two in Westminster. Therefore, David Davies is referred to in the
House of Commons in Westminster as David T.C. Davies. This has
caused opposition MPs to refer to him in jest as Top Cat.[5]
The Australian politician Doug Anthony, who was for a long time the
leader of the Country Party, was known to some of his parliamentary
colleagues as Rubber Dougie. This was, I gather, a tribute to the
flexibility of his policies, or possibly his principles.
He was a country member.
Remember?
Of course I remember.
Now that they're the National Party people call them The Nats. People
make jokes about it being a good thing that aren't still the Country
Party then. A friend even admitted that they make that joke at
National Party meetings. But when an opponent made the joke in
parliament it was a horror and they demanded it be removed from the
record.
If only they were consistently Nats, but there are Lib-Nats and
Country-Nats and Who-Knows-What-Nats according to state and state of mind.
--
Robert Bannister
Duggy
2011-08-30 03:42:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
If only they were consistently Nats, but there are Lib-Nats and
Lib-Counts.
Post by Robert Bannister
Country-Nats
Country-Counts.
Post by Robert Bannister
and Who-Knows-What-Nats according to state and state of mind.
Is it the WA Counts or the WA Nats?

I thought it was funny the way Abbot bleeted about his side having
more seats not Labor and Labor only won because of the Green and
independent seats.

His side is a coalition. He only had more seat if you added the
Liberal seats, the National seats, the WA National Party seat and the
Queensland Liberal-National seats.

As a kid I heard a NSW election report which said "The coalition now
has enough votes to govern in their own right." Does a coalition
*ever* govern in their own right?

===
= DUG.
===
Richard Bollard
2011-08-29 23:23:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 06:07:39 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian: =A0Biscuits, bikkies.
American: Cookies if they're sweet,
Brit usage has "chocolate chip cookies", a.k.a. "Maryland cookies".
You can get a few others, but I think most Brits would visualize the
choc chip ones by default.
I think it comes from Cookie Monster. Australian kids are taught the
big choc-chip things he eats are Cookies... so the bigger and the
chipper (less and less just choc) the more likely it is to be a
cookie. In my experience.
I always just sort of assumed he'd have a different name in Commonwealthia, like
the way "Top Cat" became "Boss Cat" in the UK...Biscuit Beast or something....r
Well Top Cat stayed Top Cat here. I don't know how you could change it
unless the cartoon was dubbed or re-drawn in the UK.

We broadcast the originals, no point in re-shooting them for local
colour. That way we got to know strange Americanisms like "zee" when
we were lads.
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
Peter Duncanson (BrE)
2011-08-30 09:59:40 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 30 Aug 2011 09:23:58 +1000, Richard Bollard
Post by Richard Bollard
Post by R H Draney
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 06:07:39 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian: =A0Biscuits, bikkies.
American: Cookies if they're sweet,
Brit usage has "chocolate chip cookies", a.k.a. "Maryland cookies".
You can get a few others, but I think most Brits would visualize the
choc chip ones by default.
I think it comes from Cookie Monster. Australian kids are taught the
big choc-chip things he eats are Cookies... so the bigger and the
chipper (less and less just choc) the more likely it is to be a
cookie. In my experience.
I always just sort of assumed he'd have a different name in Commonwealthia, like
the way "Top Cat" became "Boss Cat" in the UK...Biscuit Beast or something....r
Well Top Cat stayed Top Cat here. I don't know how you could change it
unless the cartoon was dubbed or re-drawn in the UK.
In the UK it was the name of the cartoon that was changed, not the name
of the character. Only the title sequence was changed to "Boss Cat". The
character remained Top Cat.
Post by Richard Bollard
We broadcast the originals, no point in re-shooting them for local
colour. That way we got to know strange Americanisms like "zee" when
we were lads.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Duggy
2011-08-30 12:57:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
On Tue, 30 Aug 2011 09:23:58 +1000, Richard Bollard
Post by Richard Bollard
Post by R H Draney
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 06:07:39 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Duggy
http://eng.clima.org.cn/Files/dengcong/confectionery/biscuit.jpg
Australian: =A0Biscuits, bikkies.
American: Cookies if they're sweet,
Brit usage has "chocolate chip cookies", a.k.a. "Maryland cookies".
You can get a few others, but I think most Brits would visualize the
choc chip ones by default.
I think it comes from Cookie Monster.  Australian kids are taught the
big choc-chip things he eats are Cookies... so the bigger and the
chipper (less and less just choc) the more likely it is to be a
cookie.  In my experience.
I always just sort of assumed he'd have a different name in Commonwealthia, like
the way "Top Cat" became "Boss Cat" in the UK...Biscuit Beast or something....r
Well Top Cat stayed Top Cat here. I don't know how you could change it
unless the cartoon was dubbed or re-drawn in the UK.
In the UK it was the name of the cartoon that was changed, not the name
of the character. Only the title sequence was changed to "Boss Cat". The
character remained Top Cat.
Boss Cat sounds like bad translation Japanese cartoons. Happy Fun
Boss Cat!

===
= DUG.
===
Mike Lyle
2011-08-26 22:14:19 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
[...]
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
I hold that "conserve" is generally best left to commercialese, while
we punters should stick with good honest plain-spoken "jam".
And home-makers. When I was in charge of the cooking section of the
local show jams and conserves were two separate sections. I think if
you're making and selling these things there's a difference. If
you're buying it's all jam (or jelly) and some has fruit in.
Ah, interesting. I make these things, but not for shows: what's the
difference between "jam" and "conserve"?
--
Mike.
Duggy
2011-08-26 22:17:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
[...]
Post by Mike Lyle
I hold that "conserve" is generally best left to commercialese, while
we punters should stick with good honest plain-spoken "jam".
And home-makers.  When I was in charge of the cooking section of the
local show jams and conserves were two separate sections.  I think if
you're making and selling these things there's a difference.  If
you're buying it's all jam (or jelly) and some has fruit in.
Ah, interesting. I make these things, but not for shows: what's the
difference between "jam" and "conserve"?
Didn't you look at the pictures?

===
= DUG.
===
Mike Lyle
2011-08-27 21:27:35 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 26 Aug 2011 15:17:03 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
[...]
Post by Mike Lyle
I hold that "conserve" is generally best left to commercialese, while
we punters should stick with good honest plain-spoken "jam".
And home-makers.  When I was in charge of the cooking section of the
local show jams and conserves were two separate sections.  I think if
you're making and selling these things there's a difference.  If
you're buying it's all jam (or jelly) and some has fruit in.
Ah, interesting. I make these things, but not for shows: what's the
difference between "jam" and "conserve"?
Didn't you look at the pictures?
No. Sorry; and I've deleted the URL.
--
Mike.
Duggy
2011-08-27 23:32:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
On Fri, 26 Aug 2011 15:17:03 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
[...]
Post by Mike Lyle
I hold that "conserve" is generally best left to commercialese, while
we punters should stick with good honest plain-spoken "jam".
And home-makers.  When I was in charge of the cooking section of the
local show jams and conserves were two separate sections.  I think if
you're making and selling these things there's a difference.  If
you're buying it's all jam (or jelly) and some has fruit in.
Ah, interesting. I make these things, but not for shows: what's the
difference between "jam" and "conserve"?
Didn't you look at the pictures?
No. Sorry; and I've deleted the URL.
So you were making claims about what to call things in a picture
without looking at the picture.

Wow.

===
= DUG.
===
Mike Lyle
2011-08-28 16:49:24 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 27 Aug 2011 16:32:01 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
On Fri, 26 Aug 2011 15:17:03 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
[...]
Post by Mike Lyle
I hold that "conserve" is generally best left to commercialese, while
we punters should stick with good honest plain-spoken "jam".
And home-makers.  When I was in charge of the cooking section of the
local show jams and conserves were two separate sections.  I think if
you're making and selling these things there's a difference.  If
you're buying it's all jam (or jelly) and some has fruit in.
Ah, interesting. I make these things, but not for shows: what's the
difference between "jam" and "conserve"?
Didn't you look at the pictures?
No. Sorry; and I've deleted the URL.
So you were making claims about what to call things in a picture
without looking at the picture.
Wow.
You can unwow. I made the claim about the words before you put up the
picture...but hang on! I'm not sure that there actually _is_ a
picture: I see no URL in Google's version of this exchange. Have I
perhaps apologised for a crime I didn't commit?
--
Mike.
Duggy
2011-08-29 01:51:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
Wow.
You can unwow. I made the claim about the words before you put up the
picture...
No.
Post by Mike Lyle
but hang on! I'm not sure that there actually _is_ a
picture: I see no URL in Google's version of this exchange. Have I
perhaps apologised for a crime I didn't commit?
I made a post:
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.folklore.urban/msg/fe4a36dea2708791?dmode=source

Which included:
===
http://www.a-taste-of-france.com/images/apricot-jam.jpg
Australian: Jam

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FvdbAdcpKow/TO4GeU58JSI/AAAAAAAABAA/WCzz_BavCn8/s=
1600/IMG_5183.JPG
Australian: Jam, Fruit Conserve.
===

Jerry Friedman replied with this:
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.folklore.urban/msg/95296c990eb55fd3?dmode=source

Which quoted the above.

You replied to Jerry, removing all of the Jam refs, but replied to
what he said.

Just because you snipped something, doesn't mean it doesn't exist.

===
= DUG.
===
Mike Lyle
2011-08-29 19:50:16 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 28 Aug 2011 18:51:39 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
Wow.
You can unwow. I made the claim about the words before you put up the
picture...
No.
Post by Mike Lyle
but hang on! I'm not sure that there actually _is_ a
picture: I see no URL in Google's version of this exchange. Have I
perhaps apologised for a crime I didn't commit?
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.folklore.urban/msg/fe4a36dea2708791?dmode=source
===
http://www.a-taste-of-france.com/images/apricot-jam.jpg
Australian: Jam
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FvdbAdcpKow/TO4GeU58JSI/AAAAAAAABAA/WCzz_BavCn8/s=
1600/IMG_5183.JPG
Australian: Jam, Fruit Conserve.
===
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.folklore.urban/msg/95296c990eb55fd3?dmode=source
Which quoted the above.
You replied to Jerry, removing all of the Jam refs, but replied to
what he said.
Ah, I see. Your memory is better than mine.
Post by Duggy
Just because you snipped something, doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
Well, no it doesn't. You are witnessing honest confusion. I have
already said "sorry", and wisely assumed I must have snipped the URL.
But a quick explanation in words would have been useful, particularly
as the URL doesn't work for me anyway. One of my books does explain a
difference, but it's far from clear.
--
Mike.
Don Freeman
2011-08-29 20:03:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
On Sun, 28 Aug 2011 18:51:39 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Duggy
Just because you snipped something, doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
But a quick explanation in words would have been useful, particularly
as the URL doesn't work for me anyway.
Which is also the standard for posting URLs, as most cautious people do
not click on a link without some sort of explanation as to where they
are going. One more reason why "Duggy" has dug himself into a few (if
not more) kill-files around here.
--
__
(oO) www.cosmoslair.com
/||\ Cthulhu Saves!!! (In case he needs a midnight snack)
Duggy
2011-08-29 23:37:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Freeman
Which is also the standard for posting URLs,
In this case I was avoiding using words as words are the issue.

This thread has been going on for ages with people describing a food
only to have confusion cause someone to assume it's something else, or
use a local name leading to some saying it's the wrong name. I was
just making it simpler. If you don't want to hit the links (and there
were a lot of them, so I understand that) or you never want to hit
links (I hardly ever do) then that's fine. But this may be the wrong
branch of the thread to get involved in.
Post by Don Freeman
most cautious people do
not click on a link without some sort of explanation
Please read the post in question. I do not explain each one, but I
explain up front that what they are and give an Australia term. If
you're afraid a picture of scones may be a picture of a sex act then
don't click. Don't bleat like a lost lamb.
Post by Don Freeman
One more reason why "Duggy" has dug himself into a few (if
not more) kill-files around here.
Your a free man to add me as well. The more arseholes that add me to
kill files the happier I am. Makes posting her more enjoyable.

Especially since the arseholes usually only post to complain and add
not real content to the group.

===
= DUG.
===
Duggy
2011-08-29 23:29:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
One of my books does explain a
difference, but it's far from clear.
On the eating end there isn't much. I'm surprised from the making end
(you did say you make it jams, didn't you?) that there isn't.

===
= DUG.
===
Mike Lyle
2011-08-30 20:51:27 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 29 Aug 2011 16:29:04 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
One of my books does explain a
difference, but it's far from clear.
On the eating end there isn't much. I'm surprised from the making end
(you did say you make it jams, didn't you?) that there isn't.
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
--
Mike.
Duggy
2011-08-31 04:37:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
On Mon, 29 Aug 2011 16:29:04 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
One of my books does explain a
difference, but it's far from clear.
On the eating end there isn't much.  I'm surprised from the making end
(you did say you make it jams, didn't you?) that there isn't.
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves

===
= DUG.
===
Nasti J
2011-08-31 22:01:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Robert Bannister
2011-08-31 23:54:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nasti J
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Now I've read the Wiki article, I still don't understand the difference.
There isn't one in my language.
--
Robert Bannister
John Francis
2011-09-01 00:06:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Nasti J
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Now I've read the Wiki article, I still don't understand the difference.
There isn't one in my language.
Generally, a conserve contains whole fruit; a jam contains fruit that
has been cut up, crushed, or otherwise broken into pieces.

With small soft fruit such as blackberries, raspberries, etc. this
distinction is often just about non-existent. I've also had things
calling themselves conserves where the fruit is not whole, although
it was still left in large pieces (perhaps simply cut in half).
Peter Moylan
2011-09-01 00:15:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Francis
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Nasti J
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Now I've read the Wiki article, I still don't understand the difference.
There isn't one in my language.
Generally, a conserve contains whole fruit; a jam contains fruit that
has been cut up, crushed, or otherwise broken into pieces.
With small soft fruit such as blackberries, raspberries, etc. this
distinction is often just about non-existent. I've also had things
calling themselves conserves where the fruit is not whole, although
it was still left in large pieces (perhaps simply cut in half).
One of my grandmothers was keen on bottling fruit, and the house was
full of jars containing things like pears. Usually peeled and cored and
halved, but not chopped up into little bits.

As I recall it, we called these "preserves" rather than "conserves". Of
course, most of the time we just said "bottled fruit".
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Skitt
2011-09-01 00:18:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by John Francis
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Nasti J
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Now I've read the Wiki article, I still don't understand the difference.
There isn't one in my language.
Generally, a conserve contains whole fruit; a jam contains fruit that
has been cut up, crushed, or otherwise broken into pieces.
With small soft fruit such as blackberries, raspberries, etc. this
distinction is often just about non-existent. I've also had things
calling themselves conserves where the fruit is not whole, although
it was still left in large pieces (perhaps simply cut in half).
One of my grandmothers was keen on bottling fruit, and the house was
full of jars containing things like pears. Usually peeled and cored and
halved, but not chopped up into little bits.
As I recall it, we called these "preserves" rather than "conserves". Of
course, most of the time we just said "bottled fruit".
It was in bottles? ;)
--
Skitt (SF Bay Area)
http://come.to/skitt
Peter Duncanson (BrE)
2011-09-01 09:44:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Skitt
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by John Francis
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Nasti J
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Now I've read the Wiki article, I still don't understand the difference.
There isn't one in my language.
Generally, a conserve contains whole fruit; a jam contains fruit that
has been cut up, crushed, or otherwise broken into pieces.
With small soft fruit such as blackberries, raspberries, etc. this
distinction is often just about non-existent. I've also had things
calling themselves conserves where the fruit is not whole, although
it was still left in large pieces (perhaps simply cut in half).
One of my grandmothers was keen on bottling fruit, and the house was
full of jars containing things like pears. Usually peeled and cored and
halved, but not chopped up into little bits.
As I recall it, we called these "preserves" rather than "conserves". Of
course, most of the time we just said "bottled fruit".
It was in bottles? ;)
Except when the bottles were called jars. Kilner made jars in which to
store preserved fruit. They were typically larger than jars used for jam
and marmalade:
http://www.kilnerjarsuk.co.uk/
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Richard Casady
2011-09-01 15:58:59 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 01 Sep 2011 10:44:31 +0100, "Peter Duncanson (BrE)"
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Skitt
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by John Francis
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Nasti J
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Now I've read the Wiki article, I still don't understand the difference.
There isn't one in my language.
Generally, a conserve contains whole fruit; a jam contains fruit that
has been cut up, crushed, or otherwise broken into pieces.
With small soft fruit such as blackberries, raspberries, etc. this
distinction is often just about non-existent. I've also had things
calling themselves conserves where the fruit is not whole, although
it was still left in large pieces (perhaps simply cut in half).
One of my grandmothers was keen on bottling fruit, and the house was
full of jars containing things like pears. Usually peeled and cored and
halved, but not chopped up into little bits.
As I recall it, we called these "preserves" rather than "conserves". Of
course, most of the time we just said "bottled fruit".
It was in bottles? ;)
Except when the bottles were called jars. Kilner made jars in which to
store preserved fruit. They were typically larger than jars used for jam
http://www.kilnerjarsuk.co.uk/
In the US, the process of putting up food in glass jars is know as
canning. You can have a pear in a bottle, by growing it there. It is
done commercially, adding booze when the fruit is ripe.

Casady
John Francis
2011-09-01 16:48:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Casady
You can have a pear in a bottle, by growing it there.
And ships, come to that.
--
John "If I could grow thyme in a bottle ..." Francis
Charles Wm. Dimmick
2011-09-01 18:25:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Francis
Post by Richard Casady
You can have a pear in a bottle, by growing it there.
And ships, come to that.
As far as the U.S. Navy was concerned it was easier to get a ship into a
bottle than to get a bottle into a ship.

charles
R H Draney
2011-09-01 18:32:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Francis
Post by Richard Casady
You can have a pear in a bottle, by growing it there.
And ships, come to that.
You can grow ships?...I think they did that on Farscape....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
David DeLaney
2011-09-01 22:05:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Francis
Post by Richard Casady
You can have a pear in a bottle, by growing it there.
And ships, come to that.
They can grow pears in ships now?
Post by John Francis
John "If I could grow thyme in a bottle ..." Francis
Dave "hydroponically yours" DeLaney
--
\/David DeLaney posting from ***@vic.com "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
http://www.vic.com/~dbd/ - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Robert Bannister
2011-09-02 01:23:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Casady
On Thu, 01 Sep 2011 10:44:31 +0100, "Peter Duncanson (BrE)"
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Skitt
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by John Francis
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Nasti J
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Now I've read the Wiki article, I still don't understand the difference.
There isn't one in my language.
Generally, a conserve contains whole fruit; a jam contains fruit that
has been cut up, crushed, or otherwise broken into pieces.
With small soft fruit such as blackberries, raspberries, etc. this
distinction is often just about non-existent. I've also had things
calling themselves conserves where the fruit is not whole, although
it was still left in large pieces (perhaps simply cut in half).
One of my grandmothers was keen on bottling fruit, and the house was
full of jars containing things like pears. Usually peeled and cored and
halved, but not chopped up into little bits.
As I recall it, we called these "preserves" rather than "conserves". Of
course, most of the time we just said "bottled fruit".
It was in bottles? ;)
Except when the bottles were called jars. Kilner made jars in which to
store preserved fruit. They were typically larger than jars used for jam
http://www.kilnerjarsuk.co.uk/
In the US, the process of putting up food in glass jars is know as
canning. You can have a pear in a bottle, by growing it there. It is
done commercially, adding booze when the fruit is ripe.
How very jarring.
--
Robert Bannister
Skitt
2011-09-02 01:57:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Casady
In the US, the process of putting up food in glass jars is know as
I have noticed this type of error ("know" in place of "known") fairly
often on Usenet. Is is just sloppy typing, or is it something more
sinister?
Post by Richard Casady
canning. You can have a pear in a bottle, by growing it there. It is
done commercially, adding booze when the fruit is ripe.
--
Skitt (SF Bay Area)
http://come.to/skitt
Drew Lawson
2011-09-02 02:47:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Skitt
Post by Richard Casady
In the US, the process of putting up food in glass jars is know as
I have noticed this type of error ("know" in place of "known") fairly
often on Usenet. Is is just sloppy typing, or is it something more
sinister?
Despite the AUE crosspost, I'll go with the standard (or at least
historical) AFU response: "spelling flames are lame."
--
Drew Lawson And I know there's more to the story
I know I need to see more
I need to see s'more, hear s'more
feel s'more. I gotta be s'more
Skitt
2011-09-02 02:58:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Drew Lawson
Post by Skitt
Post by Richard Casady
In the US, the process of putting up food in glass jars is know as
I have noticed this type of error ("know" in place of "known") fairly
often on Usenet. Is is just sloppy typing, or is it something more
sinister?
Despite the AUE crosspost, I'll go with the standard (or at least
historical) AFU response: "spelling flames are lame."
It wasn't a flame. It was a question. Now that you have confessed to
it being a misspelling, take solace in the fact that there are many poor
spellers around. It's a sad fact, though.
--
Skitt (SF Bay Area)
http://come.to/skitt
Don Freeman
2011-09-02 04:04:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Drew Lawson
Post by Skitt
Post by Richard Casady
In the US, the process of putting up food in glass jars is know as
I have noticed this type of error ("know" in place of "known") fairly
often on Usenet. Is is just sloppy typing, or is it something more
sinister?
Despite the AUE crosspost, I'll go with the standard (or at least
historical) AFU response: "spelling flames are lame."
It wasn't a flame. It was a question.
You say that like you think they are mutually exclusive.
--
__
(oO) www.cosmoslair.com
/||\ Cthulhu Saves!!! (In case he needs a midnight snack)
Peter Moylan
2011-09-02 11:27:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Freeman
Post by Drew Lawson
Post by Skitt
Post by Richard Casady
In the US, the process of putting up food in glass jars is know as
I have noticed this type of error ("know" in place of "known") fairly
often on Usenet. Is is just sloppy typing, or is it something more
sinister?
Despite the AUE crosspost, I'll go with the standard (or at least
historical) AFU response: "spelling flames are lame."
It wasn't a flame. It was a question.
You say that like you think they are mutually exclusive.
I'm a little surprised that Skitt got the reaction that he did. In the
first place, he didn't suggest that it might be a spelling error, he
suggested that it might be a typo, and in my mind that's something very
different. Even excellent spellers make typos.

In the second and more important place, it was a question looking for a
real answer. I too was wondering whether there were some parts of the
world where "known" is pronounced "know". That sort of question arises
often in alt.usage.english, where we do acknowledge that English has
many dialects. What's wrong with asking "Was that an accident, or do you
pronounce it that way?" Interpreting it as a flame comes across as being
at least mildly paranoid.
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Duggy
2011-09-02 12:02:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
I'm a little surprised that Skitt got the reaction that he did.
Expect anything different around here?

===
= DUG.
===
Peter Moylan
2011-09-02 12:16:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
Post by Peter Moylan
I'm a little surprised that Skitt got the reaction that he did.
Expect anything different around here?
For certain values of "here", I presume. I don't read afu.
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Duggy
2011-09-01 00:55:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by John Francis
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Nasti J
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Now I've read the Wiki article, I still don't understand the difference.
There isn't one in my language.
Generally, a conserve contains whole fruit; a jam contains fruit that
has been cut up, crushed, or otherwise broken into pieces.
With small soft fruit such as blackberries, raspberries, etc. this
distinction is often just about non-existent.  I've also had things
calling themselves conserves where the fruit is not whole, although
it was still left in large pieces (perhaps simply cut in half).
One of my grandmothers was keen on bottling fruit, and the house was
full of jars containing things like pears. Usually peeled and cored and
halved, but not chopped up into little bits.
As I recall it, we called these "preserves" rather than "conserves". Of
course, most of the time we just said "bottled fruit".
That's whole uncrushed fruit though, isn't it?

===
= DUG.
===
Peter Moylan
2011-09-01 10:28:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by John Francis
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Nasti J
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Now I've read the Wiki article, I still don't understand the difference.
There isn't one in my language.
Generally, a conserve contains whole fruit; a jam contains fruit that
has been cut up, crushed, or otherwise broken into pieces.
With small soft fruit such as blackberries, raspberries, etc. this
distinction is often just about non-existent. I've also had things
calling themselves conserves where the fruit is not whole, although
it was still left in large pieces (perhaps simply cut in half).
One of my grandmothers was keen on bottling fruit, and the house was
full of jars containing things like pears. Usually peeled and cored and
halved, but not chopped up into little bits.
As I recall it, we called these "preserves" rather than "conserves". Of
course, most of the time we just said "bottled fruit".
In answer to Skitt's question: jars, really, but at the time we
considered "bottles" and "jars" to be alternative terms for the same thing.
Post by Duggy
That's whole uncrushed fruit though, isn't it?
Yes. I was responding to the distinction drawn by John Francis, where he
said "conserves" meant whole fruit rather than jam. As I recall it we
made the same distinction, except that we used the word "preserves".
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Katy Jennison
2011-09-01 15:38:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Duggy
Post by Peter Moylan
As I recall it, we called these "preserves" rather than "conserves". Of
course, most of the time we just said "bottled fruit".
In answer to Skitt's question: jars, really, but at the time we
considered "bottles" and "jars" to be alternative terms for the same thing.
Post by Duggy
That's whole uncrushed fruit though, isn't it?
Yes. I was responding to the distinction drawn by John Francis, where he
said "conserves" meant whole fruit rather than jam. As I recall it we
made the same distinction, except that we used the word "preserves".
Jam, though, is "preserved" by virtue of the proportion of sugar which
is cooked into it, whereas bottled (AmE canned) fruit or veg relies on
sterilisation through the application of heat after the fruit or veg has
been sealed in the bottle (jar, can), and doesn't necessarily contain
any sugar at all.
--
Katy Jennison
Robert Bannister
2011-09-02 01:27:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Duggy
Post by Peter Moylan
As I recall it, we called these "preserves" rather than "conserves". Of
course, most of the time we just said "bottled fruit".
In answer to Skitt's question: jars, really, but at the time we
considered "bottles" and "jars" to be alternative terms for the same thing.
Post by Duggy
That's whole uncrushed fruit though, isn't it?
Yes. I was responding to the distinction drawn by John Francis, where he
said "conserves" meant whole fruit rather than jam. As I recall it we
made the same distinction, except that we used the word "preserves".
Jam, though, is "preserved" by virtue of the proportion of sugar which
is cooked into it, whereas bottled (AmE canned) fruit or veg relies on
sterilisation through the application of heat after the fruit or veg has
been sealed in the bottle (jar, can), and doesn't necessarily contain
any sugar at all.
I am not going to say this is impossible, but it sounds a bit chancy to
me. Sugar or salt are a great help in preserving fruit and vegetables,
especially if the sterilisation is not always 100%. I know our bottle
fruit always had some sugar, especially the plums.
--
Robert Bannister
Duggy
2011-09-02 01:06:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Duggy
That's whole uncrushed fruit though, isn't it?
Yes. I was responding to the distinction drawn by John Francis, where he
said "conserves" meant whole fruit rather than jam. As I recall it we
made the same distinction, except that we used the word "preserves".
Yeah, sure, I didn't mean to over pick.

It's just clarifying these things is always important on this group.

===
= DUG.
===
Robert Bannister
2011-09-02 01:22:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Francis
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Nasti J
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Now I've read the Wiki article, I still don't understand the difference.
There isn't one in my language.
Generally, a conserve contains whole fruit; a jam contains fruit that
has been cut up, crushed, or otherwise broken into pieces.
With small soft fruit such as blackberries, raspberries, etc. this
distinction is often just about non-existent. I've also had things
calling themselves conserves where the fruit is not whole, although
it was still left in large pieces (perhaps simply cut in half).
Fruit preserve? Bottled fruit?
--
Robert Bannister
Duggy
2011-09-01 00:54:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Nasti J
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Now I've read the Wiki article, I still don't understand the difference.
I'm not sure I can help you then.
Post by Robert Bannister
There isn't one in my language.
As I said earlier the differences are more on the maker's end.

===
= DUG.
===
Duggy
2011-09-01 00:51:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nasti J
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
So, you don't understand the difference either?
Cut and copy was a lot quicker than complex explanations.

===
= DUG.
===
Mike Lyle
2011-08-31 22:17:07 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 30 Aug 2011 21:37:37 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
On Mon, 29 Aug 2011 16:29:04 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
One of my books does explain a
difference, but it's far from clear.
On the eating end there isn't much.  I'm surprised from the making end
(you did say you make it jams, didn't you?) that there isn't.
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
Thank you. Sort of midway between jam and preserved fruit. With or
without nuts. I don't wholly accept the mixed-fruit definition,
though: there can be mixed fruit jam, and not necessarily the cheapo
army kind.
--
Mike.
Duggy
2011-09-01 00:53:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
On Tue, 30 Aug 2011 21:37:37 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
OK, but what _is_ that difference?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conserve_(condiment)#Conserves
Thank you.
That's OK.
Post by Mike Lyle
Sort of midway between jam and preserved fruit.
Seems that way. Although more crushing to create jam... I think.

Have you done that sort of thing or just jams and jellies?
Post by Mike Lyle
With or
without nuts. I don't wholly accept the mixed-fruit definition,
though: there can be mixed fruit jam, and not necessarily the cheapo
army kind.
Fair enough. I wasn't presenting wiki as the ultimate answer.

===
= DUG.
===
Stan Brown
2011-08-27 02:55:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
[...]
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
I hold that "conserve" is generally best left to commercialese, while
we punters should stick with good honest plain-spoken "jam".
And home-makers. When I was in charge of the cooking section of the
local show jams and conserves were two separate sections. I think if
you're making and selling these things there's a difference. If
you're buying it's all jam (or jelly) and some has fruit in.
Ah, interesting. I make these things, but not for shows: what's the
difference between "jam" and "conserve"?
And let's not even *start* on "marmalade". :-)
--
"The difference between the /almost right/ word and the /right/ word
is ... the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning."
--Mark Twain
Stan Brown, Tompkins County, NY, USA http://OakRoadSystems.com
Duggy
2011-08-27 09:42:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stan Brown
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
[...]
Post by Mike Lyle
I hold that "conserve" is generally best left to commercialese, while
we punters should stick with good honest plain-spoken "jam".
And home-makers.  When I was in charge of the cooking section of the
local show jams and conserves were two separate sections.  I think if
you're making and selling these things there's a difference.  If
you're buying it's all jam (or jelly) and some has fruit in.
Ah, interesting. I make these things, but not for shows: what's the
difference between "jam" and "conserve"?
And let's not even *start* on "marmalade". :-)
OK.

===
= DUG.
===
Lon
2011-08-27 16:37:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stan Brown
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
[...]
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
I hold that "conserve" is generally best left to commercialese, while
we punters should stick with good honest plain-spoken "jam".
And home-makers. When I was in charge of the cooking section of the
local show jams and conserves were two separate sections. I think if
you're making and selling these things there's a difference. If
you're buying it's all jam (or jelly) and some has fruit in.
Ah, interesting. I make these things, but not for shows: what's the
difference between "jam" and "conserve"?
And let's not even *start* on "marmalade". :-)
You don't want to give it a go?

Lon "Giuchie, Giuchie" Stowell
R H Draney
2011-08-27 18:18:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lon
Post by Stan Brown
Post by Mike Lyle
Ah, interesting. I make these things, but not for shows: what's the
difference between "jam" and "conserve"?
And let's not even *start* on "marmalade". :-)
You don't want to give it a go?
Lon "Giuchie, Giuchie" Stowell
Eh?...



Nothing about marmalade here....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
Mary Shafer
2011-09-02 01:48:41 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 26 Aug 2011 23:14:19 +0100, Mike Lyle
Post by Mike Lyle
On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 21:03:43 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
[...]
Post by Duggy
Post by Mike Lyle
I hold that "conserve" is generally best left to commercialese, while
we punters should stick with good honest plain-spoken "jam".
And home-makers. When I was in charge of the cooking section of the
local show jams and conserves were two separate sections. I think if
you're making and selling these things there's a difference. If
you're buying it's all jam (or jelly) and some has fruit in.
Ah, interesting. I make these things, but not for shows: what's the
difference between "jam" and "conserve"?
Both are fruit pieces in jelled juices, but conserves have more and
bigger pieces of fruit than do jams.

Mary "I like jelly, which doesn't have the fruit pieces."
--
Mary Shafer Retired aerospace research engineer
We didn't just do weird stuff at Dryden, we wrote reports about it.
***@gmail.com or ***@qnet.com
Visit my blog at http://digitalknitter.blogspot.com/
Nasti J
2011-09-02 04:31:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Shafer
Mary "I like jelly, which doesn't have the fruit pieces."
Or seeds.

I prefer boysenberry
More than any ordinary jelly.
I'm a "Citizens for Boysenberry Jelly" fan.
John Dunlop
2011-08-26 13:42:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
So you wouldn't say that "bikkies" wets your appetite.
--
John
David DeLaney
2011-08-26 19:11:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
So you wouldn't say that "bikkies" wets your appetite.
For all intensive porpoises, I wouldn't.

Dave "another words: GAAAAH DON'T DO THAT ow ow ow" DeLaney
--
\/David DeLaney posting from ***@vic.com "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
http://www.vic.com/~dbd/ - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Don Freeman
2011-08-26 19:10:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
So you wouldn't say that "bikkies" wets your appetite.
Whet did you say?
--
__
(oO) www.cosmoslair.com
/||\ Cthulhu Saves!!! (In case he needs a midnight snack)
John Dunlop
2011-08-26 19:15:21 UTC
Permalink
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
So you wouldn't say that "bikkies" wets your appetite.
Whet did you say?
Woe are you?
--
John
Mike Lyle
2011-08-26 22:17:22 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 26 Aug 2011 20:15:21 +0100, John Dunlop
Post by John Dunlop
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
So you wouldn't say that "bikkies" wets your appetite.
Whet did you say?
Woe are you?
Woe is me: I'm on first.
--
Mike.
John Dunlop
2011-08-27 10:27:43 UTC
Permalink
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
So you wouldn't say that "bikkies" wets your appetite.
Whet did you say?
Woe are you?
Woe is me: I'm on first.
Ok, riddle me this: how do you get two whales in a Mini?
--
John
Duggy
2011-08-27 10:47:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Dunlop
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
So you wouldn't say that "bikkies" wets your appetite.
Whet did you say?
Woe are you?
Woe is me: I'm on first.
Ok, riddle me this: how do you get two whales in a Mini?
Well, first I'd have to get the Mini to Great Britain.

===
= DUG.
===
John Dunlop
2011-08-27 11:07:11 UTC
Permalink
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
Ok, riddle me this: how do you get two whales in a Mini?
Well, first I'd have to get the Mini to Great Britain.
That's nothing to wail about.
--
John
Peter Duncanson (BrE)
2011-08-27 11:20:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
Post by John Dunlop
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
So you wouldn't say that "bikkies" wets your appetite.
Whet did you say?
Woe are you?
Woe is me: I'm on first.
Ok, riddle me this: how do you get two whales in a Mini?
Well, first I'd have to get the Mini to Great Britain.
Unless the whales are a new variety from the southern hemisphere, in
which case the Mini should be got to eastern Australia.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Duggy
2011-08-27 12:09:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Duggy
Post by John Dunlop
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
So you wouldn't say that "bikkies" wets your appetite.
Whet did you say?
Woe are you?
Woe is me: I'm on first.
Ok, riddle me this: how do you get two whales in a Mini?
Well, first I'd have to get the Mini to Great Britain.
Unless the whales are a new variety from the southern hemisphere, in
which case the Mini should be got to eastern Australia.
I *am* in eastern Australia. I'm trying to get to Wales... oh, wait,
two whales. Sorry, I misheard the typing.

===
= DUG.
===
Lon
2011-08-27 16:38:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
Post by John Dunlop
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
So you wouldn't say that "bikkies" wets your appetite.
Whet did you say?
Woe are you?
Woe is me: I'm on first.
Ok, riddle me this: how do you get two whales in a Mini?
Well, first I'd have to get the Mini to Great Britain.
Sadly, unless you mean the skirt, they are shrunken Bimmers now.
Skitt
2011-08-27 18:16:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Dunlop
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
[John Dunlop:]
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Mike Lyle
"Bikkies" is baby-talk, and makes me heave a little when grown-ups use
it. Brits use it, too.
So you wouldn't say that "bikkies" wets your appetite.
Whet did you say?
Woe are you?
Woe is me: I'm on first.
Ok, riddle me this: how do you get two whales in a Mini?
You put the smaller one in front.
--
Skitt (SF Bay Area)
http://come.to/skitt
Goldenwight
2011-08-26 09:48:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
http://www.muffinrecipes.net/li/muffins.jpg
Australian:  Muffins
http://dontfollowtherules.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/english...
Australian:  Muffins, English Muffins.
If you are using our local library service's internet access, anything
but 'muffin' since it triggers the net-nanny thingie. So, 'Muffin the
Mule', 'Martha and the Muffins', and 'Georgy Girl' are right out (not
that I suspect you would usually call a bakery product 'Georgy Girl').
And if you want to find out anything about the Borough of Scunthorpe,
you might as well get hold of a book!
Duggy
2011-08-26 09:57:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Goldenwight
Post by Duggy
http://www.muffinrecipes.net/li/muffins.jpg
Australian:  Muffins
http://dontfollowtherules.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/english...
Australian:  Muffins, English Muffins.
If you are using our local library service's internet access, anything
but 'muffin' since it triggers the net-nanny thingie. So, 'Muffin the
Mule', 'Martha and the Muffins', and 'Georgy Girl' are right out (not
that I suspect you would usually call a bakery product 'Georgy Girl').
And if you want to find out anything about the Borough of Scunthorpe,
you might as well get hold of a book!
It doesn't like muff?

===
= DUG.
===
Jeffrey Turner
2011-08-26 20:02:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duggy
Post by Goldenwight
Post by Duggy
http://www.muffinrecipes.net/li/muffins.jpg
Australian: Muffins
http://dontfollowtherules.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/english...
Australian: Muffins, English Muffins.
If you are using our local library service's internet access, anything
but 'muffin' since it triggers the net-nanny thingie. So, 'Muffin the
Mule', 'Martha and the Muffins', and 'Georgy Girl' are right out (not
that I suspect you would usually call a bakery product 'Georgy Girl').
And if you want to find out anything about the Borough of Scunthorpe,
you might as well get hold of a book!
It doesn't like muff?
For divers reasons.

--Jeff
Robert Bannister
2011-08-27 00:02:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Goldenwight
Post by Duggy
http://www.muffinrecipes.net/li/muffins.jpg
Australian: Muffins
http://dontfollowtherules.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/english...
Australian: Muffins, English Muffins.
If you are using our local library service's internet access, anything
but 'muffin' since it triggers the net-nanny thingie. So, 'Muffin the
Mule', 'Martha and the Muffins', and 'Georgy Girl' are right out (not
that I suspect you would usually call a bakery product 'Georgy Girl').
And if you want to find out anything about the Borough of Scunthorpe,
you might as well get hold of a book!
I don't get why "Georgy Girl" would trigger anything buy stuck tune
syndrome, although I would have spelt it "Georgie".
--
Robert Bannister
Evan Kirshenbaum
2011-08-27 01:14:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Goldenwight
Post by Duggy
http://www.muffinrecipes.net/li/muffins.jpg
Australian: Muffins
http://dontfollowtherules.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/english...
Australian: Muffins, English Muffins.
If you are using our local library service's internet access,
anything but 'muffin' since it triggers the net-nanny thingie. So,
'Muffin the Mule', 'Martha and the Muffins', and 'Georgy Girl' are
right out (not that I suspect you would usually call a bakery
product 'Georgy Girl'). And if you want to find out anything about
the Borough of Scunthorpe, you might as well get hold of a book!
I don't get why "Georgy Girl" would trigger anything buy stuck tune
syndrome, although I would have spelt it "Georgie".
Have you ever been to an orgie?
--
Evan Kirshenbaum +------------------------------------
Still with HP Labs |Reality is that which, when you
SF Bay Area (1982-) |stop believing in it, doesn't go
Chicago (1964-1982) |away.
|
***@gmail.com | Philip K. Dick

http://www.kirshenbaum.net/
Robert Bannister
2011-08-28 00:20:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Evan Kirshenbaum
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Goldenwight
Post by Duggy
http://www.muffinrecipes.net/li/muffins.jpg
Australian: Muffins
http://dontfollowtherules.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/english...
Australian: Muffins, English Muffins.
If you are using our local library service's internet access,
anything but 'muffin' since it triggers the net-nanny thingie. So,
'Muffin the Mule', 'Martha and the Muffins', and 'Georgy Girl' are
right out (not that I suspect you would usually call a bakery
product 'Georgy Girl'). And if you want to find out anything about
the Borough of Scunthorpe, you might as well get hold of a book!
I don't get why "Georgy Girl" would trigger anything buy stuck tune
syndrome, although I would have spelt it "Georgie".
Have you ever been to an orgie?
Ah, so it's OK so long as it's French. Certainly whooshed over my head.
I'm amazed they even allow G.
--
Robert Bannister
Richard Bollard
2011-08-29 23:54:33 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 28 Aug 2011 08:20:35 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Evan Kirshenbaum
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Goldenwight
Post by Duggy
http://www.muffinrecipes.net/li/muffins.jpg
Australian: Muffins
http://dontfollowtherules.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/english...
Australian: Muffins, English Muffins.
If you are using our local library service's internet access,
anything but 'muffin' since it triggers the net-nanny thingie. So,
'Muffin the Mule', 'Martha and the Muffins', and 'Georgy Girl' are
right out (not that I suspect you would usually call a bakery
product 'Georgy Girl'). And if you want to find out anything about
the Borough of Scunthorpe, you might as well get hold of a book!
I don't get why "Georgy Girl" would trigger anything buy stuck tune
syndrome, although I would have spelt it "Georgie".
Have you ever been to an orgie?
Ah, so it's OK so long as it's French. Certainly whooshed over my head.
I'm amazed they even allow G.
Well spotted!
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
tony cooper
2011-08-27 01:35:38 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 27 Aug 2011 08:02:17 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Goldenwight
Post by Duggy
http://www.muffinrecipes.net/li/muffins.jpg
Australian: Muffins
http://dontfollowtherules.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/english...
Australian: Muffins, English Muffins.
If you are using our local library service's internet access, anything
but 'muffin' since it triggers the net-nanny thingie. So, 'Muffin the
Mule', 'Martha and the Muffins', and 'Georgy Girl' are right out (not
that I suspect you would usually call a bakery product 'Georgy Girl').
And if you want to find out anything about the Borough of Scunthorpe,
you might as well get hold of a book!
I don't get why "Georgy Girl" would trigger anything buy stuck tune
syndrome, although I would have spelt it "Georgie".
Hey, there. Margaret Forster, the author of the book that spawned the
film that featured the song and ended up being an unsuccessful stage
musical, spelled it "Georgy Girl".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Robert Bannister
2011-08-28 00:21:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by tony cooper
On Sat, 27 Aug 2011 08:02:17 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Goldenwight
Post by Duggy
http://www.muffinrecipes.net/li/muffins.jpg
Australian: Muffins
http://dontfollowtherules.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/english...
Australian: Muffins, English Muffins.
If you are using our local library service's internet access, anything
but 'muffin' since it triggers the net-nanny thingie. So, 'Muffin the
Mule', 'Martha and the Muffins', and 'Georgy Girl' are right out (not
that I suspect you would usually call a bakery product 'Georgy Girl').
And if you want to find out anything about the Borough of Scunthorpe,
you might as well get hold of a book!
I don't get why "Georgy Girl" would trigger anything buy stuck tune
syndrome, although I would have spelt it "Georgie".
Hey, there. Margaret Forster, the author of the book that spawned the
film that featured the song and ended up being an unsuccessful stage
musical, spelled it "Georgy Girl".
Faulty memory. I was in my teens at the time.
--
Robert Bannister
David Hatunen
2011-08-27 18:15:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Goldenwight
If you are using our local library service's internet access, anything
but 'muffin' since it triggers the net-nanny thingie. So, 'Muffin the
Mule', 'Martha and the Muffins', and 'Georgy Girl' are right out (not
that I suspect you would usually call a bakery product 'Georgy Girl').
And if you want to find out anything about the Borough of Scunthorpe,
you might as well get hold of a book!
I don't get why "Georgy Girl" would trigger anything buy stuck tune
syndrome, although I would have spelt it "Georgie".
The much nominated and awarded movie was "Georgy Girl".
--
Dave Hatunen: Free Baja Arizona
Goldenwight
2011-08-27 10:33:02 UTC
Permalink
(not
Post by Goldenwight
that I suspect you would usually call a bakery product 'Georgy Girl').
Unless, of course, as has been so rightly pointed out to me, you are
Mr Fru T. Bunn, the sex maniac baker from Viz comic.
Ian P Noble
2011-08-30 16:59:43 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Aug 2011 15:02:08 -0700 (PDT), Duggy
Post by Duggy
"biscuit" for "cookie".
I thought it would be worth see what people called the following.
I'm listed for Australian usage [1972 - 1990 NSW, 1991 - Qld] but I'd
love to hear any contradiction of even that.
.
.
.
Post by Duggy
http://cupcakegeneral.files.wordpress.com/2007/01/cupcake_stand.gif?w=490
Australian: Cupcakes
BrE (Northern): Those are specimens of the lesser spotted "bun",
sub-species "fairy cake". Normally baked in batches of 12 in
individual paper cases in a "bun tin".

Cheers - Ian
(BrE: Yorks., Hants.)
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...